‘ahems and ahahs’

Literature, & Etc.

Archive for the ‘random’ Category

Links Galore:

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What the internet knows about you.

I’m not sure why this is entirely necessary as an analysis. I mean how insecure can a guy be…apparently this insecure. Urinal protocol vulnerability.

Slang in the Great Depression. Less’n you’re a dumbcluck, you’re gonna open up that bazoo and speak the language that taught John Swartzwelder everything he knows.

I realize this is not a link exactly but it is still awesome.

Snark.

This blog is hilarious. And this post even more so: 60ish Literary Euphemisms for Masturbation.

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Written by thebeliever07

September 3, 2009 at 6:38 pm

Posted in art, media, random, Uncategorized

Tagged with ,

One Nation…..

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…Under God, well maybe not God, maybe Literature.

Erin and I were in the Crapters recently and she asked me an intriguing literary question. If you could only read one nation’s work of literature, the authors must have a birth certificate from this nation and (here is the fun part) you are restricted from reading authors outside of this nation, which nation do you choose?

It is a difficult question to answer. So many wonderful authors from so many different countries: Ireland, Great Britain, Japan, United States, India, Mexico.

Going to think on this for a bit and will respond later, but enjoy. Cheers.

Written by thebeliever07

August 31, 2009 at 10:43 am

Posted in media, news, random

Tagged with , ,

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Reading an introduction to The Surrealist Manifesto written by Andre Breton in 1924 I was struck by a phrase that Rainey, the editor to my Modern Literature Anthology attributes to a young Breton growing up, “his omnivorous reading habits.”

I like the idea of certain books being meat oriented (Carnivorous) and some being vegetable based (Herbivorous). It makes me reflect on which category certain authors would find themselves being placed in. Someone like William Shakespeare would be considered a carnivorous read, full of meaty content and sustenance. A writer like Albert Camus though would in my mind be herbivorous by nature. Camus is indeed filling but gently and lightly, not as weighed down by all of the meat, scraps, and offal that Shakespeare brings with his epic folio.

Maybe this is crazy, something to consider though.

Written by thebeliever07

August 30, 2009 at 2:06 pm

A book should be a book, right?

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I’ve read two recent articles over at the Guardian and it has made me reflect on a trend that seems to be occurring at the moment, the blending of mixed media when it comes to the book form.

booksfuture1

Nick Cave, a musician, poet, artist, actor, dare I say it: renaissance man recently released: “Nick Cave’s new novel The Death of Bunny Munro – the story of a sex-maniac travelling salesman taking his last road trip – goes to market through the iPhone App Store, in an enhanced edition that is being launched before the print version.”

The enhanced app has the following advantages:

you can faff with fonts, change colour, bookmark it, and so on; and there’s some smart social networking stuff attached. But it also includes enhancements that could have a noticeable effect on the experience of reading. Instead of paginating the book conventionally, it’s presented as a continuous vertical scroll (one geek-pleasing trick is that you can adjust the scrolling speed with the angle of tilt of the phone), and the App includes an audiobook that syncs with the written text. Pop on the headphones, thumb the screen and Cave’s voice picks up where you left off.

So the question is? Is all of that necessary for the enjoyment of a book? Thomas Pynchon’s latest release Inherent Vice now has an added feature to “enhance” the reading. Pynchon has released a playlist to accompany the reading:

a list of the songs which feature in Inherent Vice, which follows the story of pot-smoking private eye Larry “Doc” Sportello. From The Beach Boys (God Only Knows and Help Me, Rhonda) to The Beatles (Can’t Buy Me Love), Frank Sinatra (Fly Me to the Moon) and Pink Floyd (Interstellar Overdrive), the soundtrack, whichhe designed for Amazon.com, is a journey through the music of the 1960s, the setting for his new novel.

It also includes a few fictional tunes: a song “performed” by Doc himself, Skyful of Hearts, as well as providing a nod to Scott Oof of Vineland fame, whose band Beer “performs” the theme song from The Big Valley.

Again, I have to ask if all of this is necessary for the reading of a book? I guess on the one hand I can understand that in today’s modern world with all of the distractions that are constantly around us, I can understand the desire to add some pizzazz and punch to a work of art in any medium to attract people so that they generate some interest and passion for the work. But it is also sad that it takes this much excess to draw the eye.

A book cannot be a book anymore, it must have a playlist, it must be read to us, it must glow in the dark and be downloaded instantly into our minds.

The fact that books now have “trailers” astounds me and I’m not sure if this is a good thing or not? Good in catching the eye, but as I’ve said, bad because this signifies that we are too caught up in the light-show and that these works cannot simply stand on their own now.

I enjoy mixed media and I support the arts in all of its forms, but still, sometimes a book should just be a book. Maybe I’m turning into a curmudgeon (I can hear Erin saying outloud, “turning into….” with a very particular tone).

Your thoughts?

Written by thebeliever07

August 12, 2009 at 4:15 pm

Links Galore:

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Enjoy:

Thirty-Two pages of mispelled 😉 signs in New York City, New York. The commentary is also delightful.

This next one is amazing and something I am quite thankful to have stumbled across. For all my fellow Bibliophibians: The Book Seer. Type in the name of the book you’ve just finished, and The Book Seer will provide recommendations for your next read.

I am not a big fan of Kevin Smith films in general. I find there to be a certain amount of pretension that just gets on my nerves, probably because I have a similar personality and dislike for all things in the world that anger me. That being said, his blog is hilarious at times and I was trolling around on mefi when I stumbled upon this dated but hilarious post: “On the Perils of Strip Clubs”.

First seen on the web this week, posters have sprung up in LA and Atlanta. Interesting discussions on the WashingtonPost.com site. Many different ideas about the posters and their significance. Tampa Bay Times also takes up the debate.

And this is just cool, that’s all for this your most current Links Galore post. Enjoy.

Written by thebeliever07

August 11, 2009 at 1:53 pm

Crappy Taxidermy

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Words fail me….I mean just look at….ok….you see the thing about this site that blows me away is……ok…just look at the photo below and click on it for more.

Enjoy…..as much as you can enjoy something like this. Again…words fail me.

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Written by thebeliever07

August 6, 2009 at 2:30 pm

Ernest Lessons:

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Uncle Ernest’s Life Lesson of the Week:

DDD729F9214B43E7B6D22BF6FE97F56F1“I was nibbling on a lemon cookie this morning when I happened to view the drama that is nature. A small fly flew into a brown spider’s web. As the fly struggled in vain against the web and as I watched the brown spider creep ever closer to its prey, a lovely thought came into my mind, a revelation about life and the very essence of nature: you can take the girl out of Jersey, but not the Jersey out of the girl, a friend of mine from Jersey actually eats glass, I swear to god….glass!”

Written by thebeliever07

July 26, 2009 at 8:24 am